Thursday, November 11, 2010

A New Kind of Hop

If you've been lurking around Loving Books, you'll notice that I usually participate in Crazy-for-Books weekly book blog hop. I've found some amazing blogs through the hop, but lately I've been finding that it's much more of a YA party then general fiction. I don't mind YA, but I don't usually go out of my way to read it, and have been having a hard time finding new blogs over the past few weeks that I really want to follow.

This week I wanted to give the Literary Book Blog Hop - hosted by The Blue Bookcase - a try

Literary Blog Hop

I know not everything I read is a literary masterpiece, but I think (hope) my blog will meet everyones standards, and I know if nothing else I'll find some amazing blogs to follow!

The Blue Bookcase also posed a question this week, and that question is -
What is the most difficult literary work you've ever read? What made it so difficult?

Over the past few years I've found I have a really hard time reading Charles Dickens. He's been required reading for a few of my classes and I find myself headed over to the dreaded sparknotes to get through his novels. I found Hard Times especially bad. What really kills me about Dicken's though is that I like his stories. When I read a summery or hear someone talking about them I get really excited - These sound fantastic! Why haven't I read this! (Nicholas Nickelby was another notable example.) I guess, for me, Dicken's reads really dry. He sucks the life out of well thought out, amazing tales.



16 comments:

IngridLola said...

I admit with embarrassment that I've never read any Charles Dickens. Hmm.

Lucia said...

Don't be embarrassed Ingrid, I've only read A Christmas Carol. I'm glad you've decided to participate in the Literary Hop, Sarah!

Olivia said...

One of my difficult books was Our Mutual Friend. Equally as sparknote-motivating!

readerbuzz said...

I read Great Expectations a year or so ago, and, like every classic I've tried, found it was fantastic. I had to step through it slowly, however. I don't really like to read that slowly.

NancyO said...

I'm actually a Dickens fan, but what I've noticed is that it takes a while for the story to actually get rolling. It generally takes getting through the first few chapters to get to the best of each book. But those few chapters are generally the most tedious!

Melody said...

Yeah, I'm in the middle of Our Mutual Friend. It definitely takes some work to capture the mental imagery. I find myself enjoying it though, because Dickens simply had so many preposterous ideas (characters, plots etc.)

bibliophiliac said...

I've read several novels by Dickens, but one I have not read is Our Mutual Friend. It is definitely on my radar now, though, as I have seen so many blogger discussions of it. I did read David Copperfield, Great Expectations (three times!) and Little Dorrit. Dickens is brilliant at creating vivid minor characters--I will never forget Aged P.!

JoAnn said...

I'm almost done with Bleak House now, and agree that Dickens can be wordy (difficult?) at times... in fact, the subtitle of my post today is Hard Times! Great Expectations is my favorite, and I have found that I do better with Dickens on audio.

bookaddict4real said...

For me the most difficult book to read was
"Song Of Solomon"by Toni Morrison, I had read some
of the previous book but this was one of those books you just couldn't zip through! I had to come back to it and finish it slowly so as not to miss a detail!

gautami tripathy said...

I have read a lot of classics in my school and college years. And some still remain my favorites. However, there are a few I could never get into..


Here is my Literary Blog Hop post!

Amanda said...

I'm not fond of Dickens. While I liked Great Expectations, my other attempts to read him have been horrible.

Dan Cafaro said...

Brussels sprouts aren't for everybody and neither is Dickens. Hail to his legendary status as writer and beacon of his times, but there's no shame in not connecting with his florid narrative. Your list of books read in 2010 is admirable. What did you think of Wolff and Salinger?

Letter4no1 said...

I love to see so many different views on one author! I know Dickens isn't my cup of tea but I do like to hear from people who have enjoyed him in the past

@Dan Cafaro- I'm a huge Salinger fan, I got my first taste of him late in 2009 and carried my marathon of his work into this year. I'm looking to do a piece on the Glass Family for one of my final papers.
A Vintage Affair was my first look at Wolff and I really enjoyed it. A nice break for the things I had been reading around that time.

toni said...

hard times! yes! awful.

parrish lantern said...

Oh I'm so with you on this one!! I do not get Dickens at all, I think it's a combination of having to read it at school & all those TV dramas, films & don't get me started on musicals forced on me All year round BUT especially at Xmas, what is it about Dickens & Xmas, yeah I Know "A christmas Tale " but the rest ??. enjoyed your post.
Parrish

Christopher said...

Dickens is like asparagus or avocado--you don't immediately like it, but it seriously grows on you over time.

Someone, above, mentioned that Dickens takes a few chapters to get rolling. That is so true, and then it becomes a wave that inexorably overwhelms you and sweeps you up. His stories are always profound, heart-felt, and incredibly meaningful.

My favorite Dickens novels are: Dombey and Son, Little Dorrit, Bleak House, and Our Mutual Friend. These books will 'stick-to-your-ribs' for the rest of your life. Cheers! Chris